When Doug Wright has a new play off-Broadway and it stars Hamish Linklater and John Noble, you just go. Posterity is being staged at Atlantic Theater’s mainstage right now and it’s a full two and a half hours, but it never drags. 

About a time when struggling sculpture artist, Gustav Vigeland (Hamish Linklater) is commission by his agent to make what could be the final sculpture ever of playwright Henrik Ibsen. The conflict happens to be that Ibsen is in failing health and can only sit for ten minutes at a time before having to lay down and Vigeland isn’t a fan of Ibsen.

John Noble, a little known Australian treasure of art, absolutely kills it as Ibsen. He seriously blew me away. Hamish Linklater is fabulous as well, but I knew what to expect from him as he’s always great in whatever he does. The lovely Henry Stram plays Linklater’s agent adorably. And Mickey Theis and Dale Soules as Annfinn Beck and Greta Bergstrom (Linklater’s apprentice and maid respectively) give excellent performances as well.

Posterity is playing at the Atlantic Theater Company through April 5th. Between the excellent performances and strong script, it’s a good time at the theatre. 

You know you’ve made it in New York when you can go see Shakespeare in the Park without having to wait in line. Something like that. My friend texted me two Wednesdays ago saying she had two tickets to Much Ado About Nothing and I canceled my plans to go to yoga and immediately headed to the park after work.

I’d really wanted to see this because of Hamish Linklater and Lily Rabe. Because, duh, they’re fabulous. I hadn’t seen Much Ado since I was in 5th grade and saw my high school’s production, but got the gist from reading a brief synopsis before the show that night – love triangles, tricks, and all of that. Great, so basically your typical Shakespearian comedy. To be honest, I’m a much bigger fan of Shakespeare’s dramas and tragedies than I am of his comedies. But this is Shakespeare in the Park. And it’s free. And it’s a New York tradition. It’s my tradition. There was no way I wasn’t seeing it.

Linklater and Rabe made the show for me. They were both absolutely brilliant. Brian Stokes Mitchell was miscast as Don Pedro and I barely noticed when he was onstage (and that’s saying something). There were really no weak links in this, but Linklater and Rabe just made this so-so comedy of Shakespeare’s that much better to watch.

Much Ado About Nothing plays through July 6th, so this is your last week. Get thee to the Delacorte!