Considering when I saw this show, I’m way behind on my Writing-About-Shows-I’ve-Seen-Lately. I was offered tickets to The Village Bike, MCC’s newest production, and almost turned it down but was interested after learning that Greta Gerwig (Frances Ha) was in it. And she is awesome, so that was that.

It was about a couple who had just moved from London to the English countryside and are expecting a baby. Gerwig plays Becky, the undersexed and super horny Becky and Jason Butler Harner plays John, her worried and overprotective husband. The trouble starts when Becky buys a bike from Max Shepherd, a local with a less than stellar reputation. 

I’m not quite sure what Penelope Skinner’s intentions were when she wrote this, but it was entertaining and frustrating at the same time. I enjoyed it and I thought Gerwig’s performance was great.

The Village Bike plays through July 13th. 

Really, Really.

So, for the record, first, Zosia Mamet can act. And second: this is really, really late. I saw this piece at the end of February. Whoops. What can I say, life happens.

Maybe it’s because I went to see MCC’s Really Really with low expectations, but I left extremely moved. About a college girl from a poor background with a rich boyfriend and a now-bright future ahead of her. Then her life is turned upside down when she tells her boyfriend that she was raped by one of his teammates.

This was definitely a case of she-said, he-doesn’t-remember-because-he-was-blacked-out. And with one possible act of infidelity and another possible lie about rape, she begins to tear her life and the lives of those around her apart.

The play is frustrating in a you-don’t-know-who’s-lying kind of way. It’s frustrating but also leaves you with a lot to think about afterward.

Mamet definitely impressed. Her character in this was completely dark as compared to here overly-enthused one on Girls. And she was completely convincing too. Matt Lauria (from Friday Night Lights) was also very good (I’ve never watched FNL but onstage he was good).  

I saw this a few months ago, but I still felt the need to say it was an interesting, and at times intense, piece.

Good job, MCC. 

CARRIE’s back.

Carrie was highly entertaining and much to my surprise, it was also extremely touching. Every theater probably everywhere knows about the original production of Carrie in the 80’s. It lasted about three performances on broadway and then closed with a bang. It has been one of the hugest theatrical disasters I’ve heard about in my lifetime and it’s also been on the top of my list of “flops to see” if it ever came back.

After the writers came back together in 2009 and Stafford Arima took on the task of directing, buzz around the theatrical community started to build as a workshop of a revised Carrie started to take shape. The not-for-profit originally associated with the workshop decided not to move forward with a full production so MCC Theater stepped in and in 2011 announced that the first fully staged revival of this epic disaster would be produced by their company at the Lucille Lortel Theater on Christopher Street.  And many theatre nerds drooled with anticipation for the months that would lead up to the first preview.

I scored a ticket in Row B for last Tuesday’s performance and I was excited. The cast was lead by Marin Mazzie (as the incredibly insane, overly religious mother) and Molly Ranson (as the distubred protagonist – or antagonist? – of the show). Twenty minutes into the show, I saw their relationship as very reminiscent of Wendla and her mother’s (in Spring Awakening) – the anger and hurt coming from the daughter and the overwhelming desire for the mothers to shelter their daughters from the outside world.

Anyways, the stage of the show works for the most part. The choreography is fun. The lyrics are god-awful. They’re lazy, but they were written in the 80’s and I bet it’s very hard to write lyrics that are appropriate for a campy horror movie without them being bad. I was surprised how much I liked the music, despite the lyrics.

Besides Mazzie and Ranson, Christy Altomare (as Sue Snell) was a stand-out for me. I loved her voice and her portrayal of the character was compelling. The rest of the company is energetic and vocally capable too. It’s not their fault that the material isn’t excellent, so you can’t hold their cliche characters against them.

I was a bit saddened by the lack of blood during the famous prom scene, but I can imagine it’d be hard to pull that off if you actually went through with pouring blood onstage. (Spoiler?)  

I think anyone who misses this revival will surely regret it because it’s quite possible that we’ll never see this show in New York again after this production closes. 

Being a huge fan of Neil LaBute, I knew I had to see MCC’s production of The Break of Noon.  I had no idea what it was about before going in but I knew I liked many of LaBute’s other works, such as Fat Pig, reasons to be pretty, and Filthy Talk, so I had high hopes and it wasn’t so much that Noon let me down, it was just the topic, and maybe the writing, that was a big slow.

Noon tells the story of John Smith, played convincingly by David Duchovny, who has had a life-changing experience after a shooting at his work place and he’s the only one who wasn’t killed.  He believes of course that this was god’s work and now he has made it his mission to spread god’s word. He also has the only picture of the gun-toting murderer with bodies ladying in the foreground. 

Tracee Chimo, who plays an escort who is the daughter of one of the many murdered who is caught on camera by John, is hilarious with a quick tongue and she should be seen on stage as often as possible.  Amanda Peet, portraying Duchovony’s bitter ex-wife, does her job well-enough as she fends off John’s attempts to woo her back.  

The Break of Noon is to Neil LaBute as A Life in the Theatre is to David Mamet.  It is early-LaBute, but still good and still worth an afternoon at the theatre. 

(image via)

Being a huge fan of Neil LaBute, I knew I had to see MCC’s production of The Break of Noon.  I had no idea what it was about before going in but I knew I liked many of LaBute’s other works, such as Fat Pig, reasons to be pretty, and Filthy Talk, so I had high hopes and it wasn’t so much that Noon let me down, it was just the topic, and maybe the writing, that was a big slow.

Noon tells the story of John Smith, played convincingly by David Duchovny, who has had a life-changing experience after a shooting at his work place and he’s the only one who wasn’t killed.  He believes of course that this was god’s work and now he has made it his mission to spread god’s word. He also has the only picture of the gun-toting murderer with bodies ladying in the foreground. 

Tracee Chimo, who plays an escort who is the daughter of one of the many murdered who is caught on camera by John, is hilarious with a quick tongue and she should be seen on stage as often as possible.  Amanda Peet, portraying Duchovony’s bitter ex-wife, does her job well-enough as she fends off John’s attempts to woo her back.  

The Break of Noon is to Neil LaBute as A Life in the Theatre is to David Mamet.  It is early-LaBute, but still good and still worth an afternoon at the theatre. 

(image via)