Den little Havrue (aka The Little Mermaid): Copenhagen, Denmark

On my second day in Copenhagen, I took the metro up north to see The Little Mermaid, supposedly the most photographed sight in the world. It’s amazing to think that a story by Hans Christian Andersen and a movie by Disney could lead to such a thing.  I only took a few pictures because how many photos can you really take of a statue? But I’m really happy I saw it. To be honest, it was one of my Must Sees on my list of things to do in Copenhagen because The Little Mermaid is my favorite Disney movie.

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Pro-tip for mermaid fans: There is another statue of The Little Mermaid outside of The Black Diamond (aka The Royal Library) that I was excited to find:

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Needless to say, this Little Mermaid fan was happy. 

I’ve done so much walking over the past two days and I have a huge blister on my left ankle but Copenhagen has been great.

Seeing The Little Mermaid statue today was probably the best though. I’ve loved TLM since it was released so this was a treat.

Thank you to the Danish people for knowing english so well. Without that my slightly ignorant American ass would have gotten nowhere. But really, could you have made the streets in your city more confusing? I acclimate to cities fairly well but the streets here confuse the shit out of me.

Though I did give some other tourists directions to the airport today from Central Station so that was cool.

Dear Disney Theatrical Productions…

In my opinion, word of mouth and internet hype is a large part of what makes or breaks a show nowadays (yes, even a Disney show). Do you remember when bad word of mouth basically killed Spider-man before it started previews? The New York Times rave can never hurt for native New Yorkers but word of mouth is a driving force in a shows success. I know you think you can rely on your brand alone for success but as you’ve experience before with Tarzan and The Little Mermaid this isn’t always the case. (Though I hear your latest is much better than those.)

This brings me to Aladdin. I hear it’s pretty great but I’m not sure how I’m, and people with a budget like me, are going to get to see it. I’ve been hearing horror stories of people getting to the rush line at 4:30am and still not getting tickets six hours later. This, in short, is ridiculous. The parents and once-a-year show-goer is not who’s going to spread the word of Aladdin’s potential greatness. It’s the person who’s willing to wait for a few hours on a weekend morning for a rush ticket that will blog and tweet about their experience during and after the show. I also recognize that the people who can pay $40 for a ticket aren’t going to keep your show alive financially, but they can most certainly keep the excitement about your show alive and encourage those who can afford a $150 to go drop the cash. 

In short: I hope you start designating seats for rush or, better yet, a lottery. Because even though you’re Disney, your shows still need publicity from the little people.

Edit: Ask and you shall receive: