I went to see the San Francisco Giants play the Yankees at Yankee Stadium last Friday with my dad as a belated Father’s Day gift. It was hot as hell out but luckily the sun was going down and there was water, so all was well. 

The Giants lost by 1 run (sad face) but as I watched the players of each time wind up to pitch or watching the pitcher so he could swing, I started thinking about meditation and how beneficial meditation would be to the MLB. 

I found myself thinking, “How do they block out the noise?” Seriously, between the chanting and boo’ing, I found it hard to concentrate on the action myself. How do they do it?? 

Well, a quick Google search told me that they do. A player named Shawn Green even wrote a book about it. Maybe I’ll read it. I’m glad meditation has permeated this game and it’s players because as you know, I think everyone everywhere should meditate. So, let’s take this shit mainstream and the MLB is a good place to start.

Sometimes awesome stuff happens.

Like when my friend texted me at 6pm last night and asked if I was free because he had an extra ticket in one of the suites at Yankee Stadium. He knows I am repulsed by the Yankees beyond words, and they’re weren’t playing a team I’d actually root for instead (Texas Rangers). But once he says there’s free food involved and air conditioning, I turned my computer off and peaced out of the office. 

Side note: I stopped at home first to change into my team’s shirt (San Francisco Giants – I don’t care if they weren’t play in the stadium, they were playing somewhere that night!) and then headed up. I took a B uptown to my apartment but 15 minutes later, there were no more B trains to be found. This has happened to me more than once. So I took the C to 145th and then cabbed it over to the stadium (I directed the driver via Apple Maps on my phone – seriously, what cab driver in Manhattan doesn’t know how to get to Yankee Stadium??). 

The Yankees were up, then the Rangers were up and stayed up. I gorged on salad, roasted brussel sprouts, shrimp, brocoli rabe, and a couple slices of steak, with chocolate mousse for dessert. 

We were also watching the scores that were on the board from the other games being played that night and man, Boston massacred Toronto (14-1) and the Giants beat (I forget who) 7-4. 

My friend took the above photo right after Derek Jeter was struck out (after my friend emphasized how super-duper-awesomesauce he was). I also got to catch up with my friend, who I don’t see nearly as often as we’d both like. 

My team won, the Red Sox won, the Yankees lost, and I ate on the Yankees’ dime. It was a good night.

Mr. Horvath! Yogi Bera!

I was invited to the opening night party for Bronx Bombers on Thursday night. I got to work on my “Chat With Strangers Until Your Friends Show Up” skills and conversed with some pretty interesting people. Before I headed out, I was able to snap this picture with Peter Scolari. He was pretty cool. He fist-pumped my friend and I. 

Total highlight of the week. 

Is that a Yogi-ism?

Last night one of my token straight male friends and I saw the Broadway transfer of Bronx Bombers by Eric Simonson. I strongly dislike the Yankees, but I think of it more as a history lesson than anything else. This wasn’t my first Bombers experience though: I saw it in October while it was off-Broadway at Primary Stages. I enjoyed Lombardi and Magic/Bird, so I figured I’d enjoy this too and I definitely enjoyed it, so I knew I’d like it at the Circle in the Square as well.

The Yankees pretty much made baseball a fanatical sport in America. A big part of Bombers was Yogi Berra’s (played by the fantastic Peter Scolari) struggle to make sure the fans kept coming back, entwined with a bit of fantasy and a few heated arguments between famous players. I didn’t notice a lot changes from the off-Broadway incarnation, except for a couple super fantasy moments in Yogi’s head. 

The ensemble cast, playing different roles in both acts, gelled excellently and played the multitude of roles expertly. In addition to Scolari, the cast included Christopher Jackson (Derek Jeter), Bill Dawes (Thurman Munson/Mickey Mantle), Keith Nobbs (Billy Martin), Francois Battiste (Reggie Jackson/Elston Howard), Tracy Shayne (Carmen Berra), CJ Wilson (Babe Ruth), John Wernke (Lou Gehrig), and Chris Henry Coffey (Joe DiMaggio). 

I can imagine that hardcore Yankees fans would get worked up emotionally when Berra (Scolari) describes what it means to be a Yankee. In that sense, I think Bronx Bombers will be a hit. If they can get the word out to their fans, that is.

Afterward my friend and I waited for our respective friends in the cast, his being Wenke and mine being Dawes. Bill snapped this photo:

Does he look like Mickey Mantle? I wish I could give a definitive answer, but I have no idea what the real thing person looks like. If you think he does, you should come see the show. 

If you’re a Yankees fan, or even just a history fan, I think you’ll enjoy Bronx Bombers